ILLUMINATE SF

METAMORPHOSIS

David Delgado, Dan Goods, and Jason Klimoski (2014)

Installed: November 6, 2014 - January 4, 2015
Embarcadero: Pier 15, Exploratorium

This dramatically lit, 9-foot-high by 12-foot-long steel sculpture was displayed in the Exploratorium’s public plaza.

Using a combination of water, electricity and steel, every element of Metamorphosis was designed to replicate outer space and was intended to spark curiosity about comets. It

was a 1:1000-scale model of the 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet, the destination of the decade-long Rosetta Mission by the European Space Agency supported with personnel and instruments from NASA. Mist and glow exuded like bursting particles from the “comet’s” surface. The fine mist surrounding the installation acted as the comet’s tail, while the entire piece was surrounded by a reflection pool, calling to mind the theory that comets like C-G were the ones that originally brought water to a very young planet Earth.

Artists: David Delgado is an artist, designer and educator at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory with a passion to develop experiences that celebrate the wonders of science, technology and the human condition. For the past six years he led NASA’s Imagine Mars Project where he challenged students to work with scientists and engineers to imagine, design and express their ideas through the arts. Dan Goods is a Visual Strategist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he develops creative ways of communicating, and works to transform complex concepts into meaningful stories that can be universally understood. His work is seen in public spaces, art museums, and outer space. Architect Jason Klimoski of Brooklyn-based Studio KCA was designer and fabricator. He received his Master in Architecture from Harvard University's Graduate School of Design and his Bachelor of Arts summa cum laude from University of Minnesota where he received the Sullivan Award and the Architecture and Design Excellence Award from University of Copenhagen Academy of Fine Arts.